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Mustard Gas
10-14-2010, 04:04 AM
I need to replace all six of my trailer tires and want to get some feed back on getting the very best tires for my trailer.

It is a tandem axle with ST 225/75 R 15 LRD

jws
10-14-2010, 04:08 AM
I need to replace all six of my trailer tires and want to get some feed back on getting the very best tires for my trailer.

It is a tandem axle with ST 225/75 R 15 LRD

Maxxis has a E Rated ST 225/75 R15 :vib::vib::vib::vib:

QH
10-14-2010, 04:46 AM
Maxxis has a E Rated ST 225/75 R15 :vib::vib::vib::vib:

That's what I got through America's tire, improved my MPG significantly. Tandem axle? That big ol trailer doesn't have 3 axles???

yz450mm
10-14-2010, 05:09 AM
America's Tire usually has the best deals, and you can get free flat repairs at any of their shops. I went with LT load range E for my 27' FW, total of $480 for 4 (mounted/balanced) if I remember right...

high desert
10-14-2010, 07:24 AM
Fuck 15's. <_<

In other words......I got nothin'

Mustard Gas
10-15-2010, 02:08 AM
yea going to go to Americas tire after I do some internet shopping to find a really low price so they can match it.....Bob would be proud of me!

Speaking of Bob...........you have been in, on and around my trailer like 1,000,000,000 times and you never noticed it had three axles ????? :rrc:

KxRdr
07-15-2011, 01:13 AM
I replaced the 2 rear Maxxis Load E tires in April on our trailer because they looked worn.
I decided to replace the remaining 4 tires before this trip to Utah next month. I'm glad I did. The middle tire on the passenger side had tread separation and one tire on the other side had lost it's shape. I thought that these Thailand ( Maxxis ) tires were better than Chinese imports. If I have to replace tires every 2 years for my own nervous nelly piece of mind then I don't necessarily believe that the Maxxis tire brand are worth the extra 50 bucks each. I might as well have bought 6 Chinese tires for the price of 4 Maxxis. If I had not looked at my tires and was not firm on replacing them I wouldn't have made it to Barstow. In 2 years I'm looking at upgrading to 16 inch wheels.

KxRdr
07-15-2011, 01:20 AM
Here's a pic of what I found today.http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii248/coribdx/KitchenDylanTrailertires2011010.jpg
Middle passenger side tire ( I didn't hit any curbs with this side of the trailer ) and is only 2 years old.

jws
07-15-2011, 01:27 AM
If you are paying $50 more per tire for the maxxis - I have a bridge I want to sell you....... LOL

2BH
07-15-2011, 01:46 AM
It is a tandem axle with ST 225/75 R 15 LRD


Speaking of Bob...........you have been in, on and around my trailer like 1,000,000,000 times and you never noticed it had three axles ????? :rrc:

Hey Einstein, Tandem = double axel, you have tripples.

Someone has to watch Bob's back here, he obviously has a tough time standing up for what he thinks and feels and expressing his opinion.:buford:


:rolleyes::ph43r::htfu:

2BH
07-15-2011, 01:49 AM
Here's a pic of what I found today.http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii248/coribdx/KitchenDylanTrailertires2011010.jpg
Middle passenger side tire ( I didn't hit any curbs with this side of the trailer ) and is only 2 years old.

That is belt slipping aka future freeway fodder!

ssduane
07-15-2011, 01:51 AM
whats everyones thoughts on this company? http://www.greenball.com/, Yes they outsource like others, including Goodyear Marathons, Made in China, but I like their About US section.

Also, have some of the Tow Masters on my trailer now, working good, seem to be lasting long time.

2BH
07-15-2011, 01:54 AM
yea going to go to Americas tire after I do some internet shopping to find a really low price so they can match it.....

Call Brian at the Orangevale Americas Tire 916-989-2927... for me he beat internet and his fellow Americas Tire locations prices.

God Bless the salesmen who love to win!:buford:

thmTerry
07-15-2011, 03:18 AM
whats everyones thoughts on this company? http://www.greenball.com/, Yes they outsource like others, including Goodyear Marathons, Made in China, but I like their About US section.

Also, have some of the Tow Masters on my trailer now, working good, seem to be lasting long time.

I did a big meeting with GreenBall Tire in the past. The only reason they built trailer tires is because Weekend Warrior gave them a big trailer tire contract,

They dont give a phuck about USA and are just trying to make a buck.

diirk
07-15-2011, 01:47 PM
Most people seem to think that trailer tires are like tires on a car and will wear down the same and last until the tread is gone. That's rarely the case. What kills trailer tires is the heat cycling they go through which depletes the chemicals that keep the tires pliant. After a couple of years you see what KxRdr posted and/or major cracking of the sidewalls. Time for new tires.

Big Buford
07-15-2011, 02:13 PM
If you are paying $50 more per tire for the maxxis - I have a bridge I want to sell you....... LOL

Tire prices have gone up a shit load since the 1st of the year :bs:

SS I might take a look at the Hurcules tire that Jaxclan posted, it was on a rim so didnt get to check it out real good, but was a very nice looking tire.

I just got a set of bridgestone duravis R250 and am hoping for 5 yrs out of them. They should make it :buford:

QH
07-15-2011, 02:22 PM
Most people seem to think that trailer tires are like tires on a car and will wear down the same and last until the tread is gone. That's rarely the case. What kills trailer tires is the heat cycling they go through which depletes the chemicals that keep the tires pliant. After a couple of years you see what KxRdr posted and/or major cracking of the sidewalls. Time for new tires.

My own hypothesis is that the weight of the toy haulers sitting on the tires in one spot for extended periods is what kills them more quickly than other tires. They get the flat spots in them then get rolled out whenever we take them out and I think this is what causes their failures over time. I know when I had a trucking company and my trucks sat for even a couple days it was like driving on tires with huge flat spots until things warmed up and rolled out. I'm betting if we jacked up our trailers and left them with no weight on the tires while we stored them the tires would last much longer. If heat cycling was the issue, why can you sit a hot rod, boat trailer, motorcycle for years at a time taking it out 3-4 times a year and tires is never an issue? My boat trailer tires have always lasted MUCH longer than my toy hauler tires under the exact same conditions other than weight they carried. That's my story and I'm sticking to it <_<

diirk
07-15-2011, 02:46 PM
My own hypothesis is.....That's my story and I'm sticking to it <_<


Bob, as always...you are correct.

But, weight is directly attrubuted to the heat generated. As are the flat spots. You have a flat spot, the tire warms up, it warms up unevenly, causing structural damage. Or, you have a heavy load, it creates more heat in the tire. If you're loaded unevenly, the tires carrying more load will be hotter. It all ties together. But imo, it all goes back to heat cycling as the root cause.

I expect the automatic contrary response to anything political, but tires? Really? :rotfl:

Big Buford
07-15-2011, 03:01 PM
Most people seem to think that trailer tires are like tires on a car and will wear down the same and last until the tread is gone. That's rarely the case. What kills trailer tires is the heat cycling they go through which depletes the chemicals that keep the tires pliant. After a couple of years you see what KxRdr posted and/or major cracking of the sidewalls. Time for new tires.

My own hypothesis is that the weight of the toy haulers sitting on the tires in one spot for extended periods is what kills them more quickly than other tires. They get the flat spots in them then get rolled out whenever we take them out and I think this is what causes their failures over time. I know when I had a trucking company and my trucks sat for even a couple days it was like driving on tires with huge flat spots until things warmed up and rolled out. I'm betting if we jacked up our trailers and left them with no weight on the tires while we stored them the tires would last much longer. If heat cycling was the issue, why can you sit a hot rod, boat trailer, motorcycle for years at a time taking it out 3-4 times a year and tires is never an issue? My boat trailer tires have always lasted MUCH longer than my toy hauler tires under the exact same conditions other than weight they carried. That's my story and I'm sticking to it <_<

I think your both right.

I beleive it is heat and weight vrs a 23lb tire made for profit. My thought is most trailer tires are mom and pops throwing some food and a couple clothes in for a short weekend with a nice drive (hour or 2) to a paved site and camping for the weekend.

We on the other hand, load our shit too the max, carry 100+ gals of water, travel ca's F-ed up roads, run dirt roads with rocks, and squish those little tires for all their worth. Something has to give...

I ran a set of Michelin xps ribs on one of my trailers and they lasted 5+ years easy without any issues. The Bridgestone R250 is basically a copy of that tire coming in at 54lbs per tire. They are extremely thick in the sidewall and corner tread area where most tires fail.

Kinda a pay me now or pay me later deal, think you actualy come out ahead with much less stress getting the better tires from the get go if your going to be keeping your trailer 5+ years :vib:

QH
07-15-2011, 03:14 PM
I expect the automatic contrary response to anything political, but tires? Really? :rotfl:

Your not paying close attention then Eric! Unlike most I don't pray/submit to an ideology be it left or right. I use my brain and try to form a pragmatic opinion on anything and everything political. Case in point, affirmative action? isn't every good liberal for it? guns? death penalty? hookers? ok I'm for hookers, but I'm not sure if that makes me a liberal commie or a right wing zealot??? :buford:

Not buying the heat cycling logic, if it were true wouldn't trailer tires in Alaska last way longer than ours? You didn't expect me just to agree with you did ya?? :D

QH
07-15-2011, 03:18 PM
Kinda a pay me now or pay me later deal, think you actualy come out ahead with much less stress getting the better tires from the get go if your going to be keeping your trailer 5+ years :vib:

Yeah may be right, but Scottie had about the best tires money can buy and they failed. Again, why do boat trailer tires last so long going through the same heat cycles?? I think your right on about the weight we carry, that really seems to be the only difference. Would be very curious to see what the tire life would be if we lifted the tires off the ground every time we parked for extended periods...

CHAIN_DOGG
07-15-2011, 03:42 PM
I wonder how these would hold out ?




http://oldergeeks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/honey_tire.jpg

QH
07-15-2011, 03:49 PM
I wonder how these would hold out ?




http://oldergeeks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/honey_tire.jpg

Or solid rubber tires like you see on fork lifts :dude:

jackxclan
07-15-2011, 04:33 PM
Yeah may be right, but Scottie had about the best tires money can buy and they failed. Again, why do boat trailer tires last so long going through the same heat cycles?? I think your right on about the weight we carry, that really seems to be the only difference. Would be very curious to see what the tire life would be if we lifted the tires off the ground every time we parked for extended periods...

I think that's a big part of it bob lots of trailors parked heavy leaves flat spots on the tires. I believe the cords are harmed from this

2BH
07-15-2011, 05:02 PM
Yeah may be right, but Scottie had about the best tires money can buy and they failed. Again, why do boat trailer tires last so long going through the same heat cycles?? I think your right on about the weight we carry, that really seems to be the only difference. Would be very curious to see what the tire life would be if we lifted the tires off the ground every time we parked for extended periods...

for he record, My G614 RST's were on my trailer for better than 6 years and over 35k miles. I would put them on again except they now cost over $400 each rather than the $190 I paid in 2005

I bought what BB bought, Duravis R250 at $195 per tire and this time I will replace them on their 5 year anniversary because even the best rubber will fail. They are as firm as the GY's only E rated not G, I didn't need G weight rating but took it along with the 110psi. All said, I would buy them again if they were not so damn expensive.

Speaking of heat... I have taken laser readings on ST Marathons against my G614's on the same trip, up the same grade, at about the same weight immediatley upon stopping and my G's were 14 degrees cooler than the ST Marathons with the soft sidewalls.

QH
07-15-2011, 05:41 PM
for he record, My G614 RST's were on my trailer for better than 6 years and over 35k miles. I would put them on again except they now cost over $400 each rather than the $190 I paid in 2005

I bought what BB bought, Duravis R250 at $195 per tire and this time I will replace them on their 5 year anniversary because even the best rubber will fail. They are as firm as the GY's only E rated not G, I didn't need G weight rating but took it along with the 110psi. All said, I would buy them again if they were not so damn expensive.

Speaking of heat... I have taken laser readings on ST Marathons against my G614's on the same trip, up the same grade, at about the same weight immediatley upon stopping and my G's were 14 degrees cooler than the ST Marathons with the soft sidewalls.

Holy shit bro, I didn't attack your :gay:ness quotient <_<

I was kinda referring to your quote to me in an e-mail "that any tire, top of line or cheap ass have a road life of 4-5 years MAX regardless of the mileage or use". I promise never to talk shit about your tires again :ass:

QH
07-15-2011, 05:47 PM
Speaking of heat... I have taken laser readings on ST Marathons against my G614's

Really, laser readings? :rolleyes:

I go by the "Can You See The Air" Tire inspection method.

When you can see the air your fucked :buggs:

Big Buford
07-15-2011, 06:09 PM
last trip out on the 4th....Front truck 110deg, rear 130 deg
Trailer front axle 110 deg, middle 112 deg, rear 115 deg.

What you dont have a temp gun bob :rotfl:

thmTerry
07-15-2011, 06:24 PM
Bob, as always...you are correct.


I expect the automatic contrary response to anything political, but tires? Really? :rotfl:


I feel your pain Diirk:rotfl::rotfl:

QH
07-15-2011, 06:30 PM
I feel your pain Diirk:rotfl::rotfl:

You would :coffee:

QH
07-15-2011, 06:33 PM
last trip out on the 4th....Front truck 110deg, rear 130 deg
Trailer front axle 110 deg, middle 112 deg, rear 115 deg.

What you dont have a temp gun bob :rotfl:

When I was 16 I had a job at a gas station and this old dude came in with slicks on his car, I mean every tire was worn beyond the tread. I told him it might be time to consider a new set of tires. He said "You can't see the air yet can ya? I'm good..."

Funny the shit that sticks with you over the years. It's been my guiding principle on tires ever since <_<

2BH
07-15-2011, 09:02 PM
Mine just arrived! 4 + one of those new-fangled space-saving expand-o-spares :dude:

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y127/2BlueHeelers/Ragen%20Pics/Tires/BridgestoneR250.jpg

rivermobster
07-15-2011, 10:24 PM
I need to replace all six of my trailer tires and want to get some feed back on getting the very best tires for my trailer.

It is a tandem axle with ST 225/75 R 15 LRD

Michelin XPS Rib 16's. Ive had em on my 26FS for quite a few years already! Tows 10 times better than it did with 15" radials it came with. Not cheap, when you add the new wheels youll need into the mix, but after i blew up Three carlises on a St Anthony's trip, i didnt care how much they cost!

Eagle Alloy used to make the wheel you needed, with the correct back spacing, but i really dont know if they are even around anymore.

Just find a 16" alloy wheel, with the same back spacing as what you have now, and they should fit perfectly.

jackxclan
07-15-2011, 10:55 PM
Mine just arrived! 4 + one of those new-fangled space-saving expand-o-spares :dude:

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y127/2BlueHeelers/Ragen%20Pics/Tires/BridgestoneR250.jpg

Those look like mine but mine are 14 ply G rated :vib: and cheaper :ph43r:

jackxclan
07-15-2011, 10:59 PM
Michelin XPS Rib 16's. Ive had em on my 26FS for quite a few years already! Tows 10 times better than it did with 15" radials it came with. Not cheap, when you add the new wheels youll need into the mix, but after i blew up Three carlises on a St Anthony's trip, i didnt care how much they cost!

Eagle Alloy used to make the wheel you needed, with the correct back spacing, but i really dont know if they are even around anymore.

Just find a 16" alloy wheel, with the same back spacing as what you have now, and they should fit perfectly.

The eagle's I had on the old trailer were 1/2 inch off on back space, but were ok after I flipped the axle's. eagle is still around.

SoCal
07-16-2011, 12:10 AM
When I was 16 I had a job at a gas station and this old dude came in with slicks on his car, I mean every tire was worn beyond the tread. I told him it might be time to consider a new set of tires. He said "You can't see the air yet can ya? I'm good..."

Funny the shit that sticks with you over the years. It's been my guiding principle on tires ever since <_<


16? werent they wooden spokes with a band of steel around them back then?

QH
07-16-2011, 12:46 AM
16? werent they wooden spokes with a band of steel around them back then?

Don't be an :ass:, :ass:. The spokes were metal by then <_<

2BH
07-16-2011, 12:57 AM
16? werent they wooden spokes with a band of steel around them back then?

Don't be an :ass:, :ass:. The spokes were metal by then <_<

correction http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_pZORfMje7i8/RghTOvxcgpI/AAAAAAAAAQc/C33OFRg1N74/s200/bc-cartoon-1.gif

Big Buford
07-16-2011, 01:31 AM
Those look like mine but mine are 14 ply G rated :vib: and cheaper :ph43r:

Way to take one for the team mark, we'll know in 5 yrs :vib: Really is a good looking tire though, no reason it shouldnt work well. May go that route next time if yours work out well :buford:

QH
07-16-2011, 03:40 AM
correction http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_pZORfMje7i8/RghTOvxcgpI/AAAAAAAAAQc/C33OFRg1N74/s200/bc-cartoon-1.gif

aren't you older than me :ass: or was that just an example of what they were running when you worked at Philips 66 as a Highway Hostess collecting green stamps?

2BH
07-16-2011, 04:19 AM
aren't you older than me :ass: or was that just an example of what they were running when you worked at Philips 66 as a Highway Hostess collecting green stamps?

Want some penis?

http://rvtravel.com/publish/images/hostess.jpg

QH
07-16-2011, 06:53 AM
:rotfl::rotfl: I had no idea what they actually did until I went to the site you stole the pic from...

"In 1939, Phillips 66 geared up for one of the nation’s most creative clean up acts. It hired a half dozen registered nurses, sent them briefly to restroom cleaning school, and then dispatched them to the road to inspect potties. They were dubbed Highway Hostesses."

Big Buford
11-29-2011, 08:11 PM
Copied from .net

This was originally posted on some thread here and has been posted on many other forums since, but it answers your questions so here it is: "Read the following and learn from this RV.net fellows research. MIKE As we banter about regarding tire types and loading, I believe that we are finally starting to understand a few important things. I have asked many times for someone to explain how a ST tire can be rated to carry more weight than a LT tire in a similar size, without a good answer. The answer lies in what is called reserve capacity. To quote from Trailer Parts Superstore and this same statement exist on just about every tire site: HEAVY DUTY 'LT' TRUCK / TRAILER TIRES 'LT' signifies the tire is a "Light Truck/Trailer" series that can be used on trailers that are capable of carrying heavy cargo such as equipment trailers. If a tire size begins with 'LT' it signifies the tire is a "Light Truck-metric" size that was designed to be used on trailers that are capable of carrying heavy cargo or tow vehicles. Tires branded with the "LT" designation are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo. So what is reserve capacity? It is capacity beyond the rating of the tire, capacity that is held in reserve. This reserve capacity comes from the heavy-duty sidewall of the LT type tires. LT's rank at the top of the list when we look at P, ST and LT tires. Now I finally have an answer to how a ST tire can be rated to carry more weight than a LT tire of similar size. The ratings of ST tires infringe into the reserve capacity of the tire. This is double bad, because the design of the ST gives us a tire with less reserve capacity to start with as it has a lighter sidewall to start with as most ST tires are much lighter than their LT counterparts. To quote one tire site: "Put a different way, the load carrying capacity of an ST tire is 20% greater than an LT tire. Since durability is strictly a long term issue - and the results of a tire failure on a trailer are much less life threatening than on a truck - the folks that set up these load / inflation pressure relationships allow a greater......ah......let's call it load intensity." There it is in print to be read. They make a calculated decision to give the ST tire a higher load rating because a failure is less life threatening. I have on a number of occasions pointed out the weight difference between the different tires and have been told that does not matter. Well it does matter. The rubber in the average tire only makes up around 40 some percent of its weight, the rest is in the steel belts, gum strips, steel beads, and the carcass plies. The remaining 60 or so percent of the stuff in a tire is what builds in the reserve capacity. So to review again, here are some weights: 1. Michelin XPS RIB LT235/85R16 LRE (rated to 3042lbs) Weight 55.41 2. Goodyear G614 LT235/85R16 LRG (rated to 3750lbs) Weight 57.5 3. Bridgestone Duravis R250 LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 60 4. BFG Commercial TA LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 44.44 5. Uniroyal Laredo HD/H LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 44.44 6. GY Marathon ST235/80R16 LRE(rated to 3420lbs) Weight 35.4 So which tires on the list have the most reserve capacity? Well that is not a completely simple answer, as one of the tires is a G rate 110 lb tire and the rest are LRE at 80lb inflation. So if we disregard the G614, then the Michelin XPS RIB and the Bridgestone Duravis R250 due to their all-steel ply construction will have the most reserve capacity inherent in their construction. The twin Commercial TA and Laredo will be next and the Marathon would have little or no reserve capacity available because it was used up in its higher load rating, AND because of it's much lighter construction it had much less inherent reserve capacity to start with. So what have we learn from this? I think that the first thing that we learned was that a LT tire can be used at or near it max rated loading without having issues, as they built with "substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo". The second thing we may have learned is why ST tires are failing on mid to larger 5th wheels, in that they do not have inherent reserve capacity beyond that rated max loading. Again this is because they have less reserve capacity to start with and their greater "load intensity" used up any reserve capacity that might have been available. Now, here is an interesting bit of information. I just called Maxxis Tech Line and asked the weights for two tires. ST235/80R16 LRD 3000 lb rating at 65 lbs of air weights 38.58 ST235/80R16 LRE 3420 lb rating at 80 lbs of air weights 43.43 What??? The Maxxis load range E tire weights almost the same as the Commercial TA?? This is a ST tire that has heavier construction than the GY Marathon at 35.4 lbs. So it has more inherent reserve capacity due to its heavier construction. Those that claimed its virtues maybe did not know why it was a better ST tire than some of the others, but there it is! It is a heavier built tire with more reserve capacity. So as one chooses a replacement tire or is asking for an upgrade on a new trailer please get educated on where the reserve capacity exist. Is it inherent in the tire you choose or do you have to factor it into the weight rating of the tire you choose. Those with heavy trailers that are switching to 17.5 rims and tires rated to 4805 lbs and getting a double injection of reserve capacity, in that they are using a tire with lots of inherent reserve capacity and the tire has much more capacity than the application. It is all starting to make sense. :buford:

s@ndm@n
11-29-2011, 10:01 PM
what?!?

thmTerry
11-29-2011, 10:05 PM
:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl: Thats what I was thinking

what?!?

jws
11-29-2011, 10:25 PM
Copied from .net

This was originally posted on some thread here and has been posted on many other forums since, but it answers your questions so here it is: "Read the following and learn from this RV.net fellows research. MIKE As we banter about regarding tire types and loading, I believe that we are finally starting to understand a few important things. I have asked many times for someone to explain how a ST tire can be rated to carry more weight than a LT tire in a similar size, without a good answer. The answer lies in what is called reserve capacity. To quote from Trailer Parts Superstore and this same statement exist on just about every tire site: HEAVY DUTY 'LT' TRUCK / TRAILER TIRES 'LT' signifies the tire is a "Light Truck/Trailer" series that can be used on trailers that are capable of carrying heavy cargo such as equipment trailers. If a tire size begins with 'LT' it signifies the tire is a "Light Truck-metric" size that was designed to be used on trailers that are capable of carrying heavy cargo or tow vehicles. Tires branded with the "LT" designation are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo. So what is reserve capacity? It is capacity beyond the rating of the tire, capacity that is held in reserve. This reserve capacity comes from the heavy-duty sidewall of the LT type tires. LT's rank at the top of the list when we look at P, ST and LT tires. Now I finally have an answer to how a ST tire can be rated to carry more weight than a LT tire of similar size. The ratings of ST tires infringe into the reserve capacity of the tire. This is double bad, because the design of the ST gives us a tire with less reserve capacity to start with as it has a lighter sidewall to start with as most ST tires are much lighter than their LT counterparts. To quote one tire site: "Put a different way, the load carrying capacity of an ST tire is 20% greater than an LT tire. Since durability is strictly a long term issue - and the results of a tire failure on a trailer are much less life threatening than on a truck - the folks that set up these load / inflation pressure relationships allow a greater......ah......let's call it load intensity." There it is in print to be read. They make a calculated decision to give the ST tire a higher load rating because a failure is less life threatening. I have on a number of occasions pointed out the weight difference between the different tires and have been told that does not matter. Well it does matter. The rubber in the average tire only makes up around 40 some percent of its weight, the rest is in the steel belts, gum strips, steel beads, and the carcass plies. The remaining 60 or so percent of the stuff in a tire is what builds in the reserve capacity. So to review again, here are some weights: 1. Michelin XPS RIB LT235/85R16 LRE (rated to 3042lbs) Weight 55.41 2. Goodyear G614 LT235/85R16 LRG (rated to 3750lbs) Weight 57.5 3. Bridgestone Duravis R250 LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 60 4. BFG Commercial TA LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 44.44 5. Uniroyal Laredo HD/H LT235/85R16 LRE(rated to 3042lbs) Weight 44.44 6. GY Marathon ST235/80R16 LRE(rated to 3420lbs) Weight 35.4 So which tires on the list have the most reserve capacity? Well that is not a completely simple answer, as one of the tires is a G rate 110 lb tire and the rest are LRE at 80lb inflation. So if we disregard the G614, then the Michelin XPS RIB and the Bridgestone Duravis R250 due to their all-steel ply construction will have the most reserve capacity inherent in their construction. The twin Commercial TA and Laredo will be next and the Marathon would have little or no reserve capacity available because it was used up in its higher load rating, AND because of it's much lighter construction it had much less inherent reserve capacity to start with. So what have we learn from this? I think that the first thing that we learned was that a LT tire can be used at or near it max rated loading without having issues, as they built with "substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo". The second thing we may have learned is why ST tires are failing on mid to larger 5th wheels, in that they do not have inherent reserve capacity beyond that rated max loading. Again this is because they have less reserve capacity to start with and their greater "load intensity" used up any reserve capacity that might have been available. Now, here is an interesting bit of information. I just called Maxxis Tech Line and asked the weights for two tires. ST235/80R16 LRD 3000 lb rating at 65 lbs of air weights 38.58 ST235/80R16 LRE 3420 lb rating at 80 lbs of air weights 43.43 What??? The Maxxis load range E tire weights almost the same as the Commercial TA?? This is a ST tire that has heavier construction than the GY Marathon at 35.4 lbs. So it has more inherent reserve capacity due to its heavier construction. Those that claimed its virtues maybe did not know why it was a better ST tire than some of the others, but there it is! It is a heavier built tire with more reserve capacity. So as one chooses a replacement tire or is asking for an upgrade on a new trailer please get educated on where the reserve capacity exist. Is it inherent in the tire you choose or do you have to factor it into the weight rating of the tire you choose. Those with heavy trailers that are switching to 17.5 rims and tires rated to 4805 lbs and getting a double injection of reserve capacity, in that they are using a tire with lots of inherent reserve capacity and the tire has much more capacity than the application. It is all starting to make sense. :buford:

Bob is that you???





















:vib::vib::vib::vib:

QH
11-29-2011, 10:43 PM
Bob is that you???

:vib::vib::vib::vib:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUBfzq8ysdg

jws
11-29-2011, 10:49 PM
You talkin to me????

2BH
11-30-2011, 01:09 AM
It amazes me that most off-roaders will spare no expense for billet mirrors, fancy paint jobs, cool wheels and accessories but won't drop proper coin on good tires for their rigs that transport and protect their toys adorned with billet mirrors, fancy paint jobs, cool wheels and accessories.

...just sayin




oh, and here are some nice titties!

http://www.titu.com/tits-university/cierra-spice-nice-tits.jpg

ssduane
11-30-2011, 02:41 AM
It amazes me that most off-roaders will spare no expense for billet mirrors, fancy paint jobs, cool wheels and accessories but won't drop proper coin on good tires for their rigs that transport and protect their toys adorned with billet mirrors, fancy paint jobs, cool wheels and accessories.

...just sayin




oh, and here are some nice titties!

http://www.titu.com/tits-university/cierra-spice-nice-tits.jpg

I here you, I thought I was buying good tires, even started getting the Goodyear Marathons, fuck that, I'm done. Bling is for :vib: I like to ride my shit like JT fucks up a piece of bacon.

Oh yah, nice :boob:

J.T.
11-30-2011, 02:44 AM
I here you, I thought I was buying good tires, even started getting the Goodyear Marathons, fuck that, I'm done. Bling is for :vib: I like to ride my shit like JT fucks up a piece of bacon.

Oh yah, nice :boob:

:dude: Turkey bacon these days though

ssduane
12-03-2011, 04:07 PM
BF Goodrich Commercial T/A's "Made in the USA"

LT235-85-16LRE's up from the 235-80-16 ST's gap getting a little cloe with the 1" taller tires. :vib:

http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x271/Hooliduane/IMAG0388.jpg

http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x271/Hooliduane/IMAG0389.jpg

truggyboy
12-03-2011, 04:08 PM
Wow that is close

ssduane
12-03-2011, 04:10 PM
Wow that is close

its about 1.5" so should be good, looks closer, these tires are BIG.

jws
12-03-2011, 04:16 PM
:vib::vib::vib::vib::vib:

truggyboy
12-03-2011, 04:24 PM
its about 1.5" so should be good, looks closer, these tires are BIG.

:dude:
Still trying to see what Im gonna do. but if I go with bfg's I will have to buy 5 wheels too :eek: gonna get pricey

2BH
12-04-2011, 09:14 PM
Very NICE Duane! Welcome to the LT Crew:boob:

ssduane
12-05-2011, 12:17 AM
:dude:
Still trying to see what Im gonna do. but if I go with bfg's I will have to buy 5 wheels too :eek: gonna get pricey

with only 7k max, you should be able to find something in the D's easy, even C's. All youn need is a 2k tire.

Very NICE Duane! Welcome to the LT Crew:boob:

Hopefully these things last, be nice to go a few years without any problems with tires.

2BH
12-05-2011, 02:21 AM
Hopefully these things last, be nice to go a few years without any problems with tires.

The trick is replacing before you have a blowout. I am going to change mine every 5 years regardless of how they "look". Doing that this last time would have saved serious coin.

CHAIN_DOGG
12-05-2011, 02:30 AM
The trick is replacing before you have a blowout. I am going to change mine every 5 years regardless of how they "look". Doing that this last time would have saved serious coin.

you should change the top on your avatar , before it blows out. those boobies been bouncing in there for a long time.

ssduane
12-05-2011, 02:30 AM
The trick is replacing before you have a blowout. I am going to change mine every 5 years regardless of how they "look". Doing that this last time would have saved serious coin.

Yah, honestly I screwed up. All my tires I had were LRE's, but the one that blew was a LRD. Apparently somewhere along the way I replaced one with a D and don't remember it. Before I left I made sure all my tires were sitting at 76ish psi, well the LRD with a max 65 psi didn't seem to like it.

I only noticed the LRD on the side when I threw it in the back of the truck to get new tread put on.

2BH
12-05-2011, 05:59 PM
you should change the top on your avatar , before it blows out. those boobies been bouncing in there for a long time.

would these be better:boob:

http://www.gifsoup.com/view/991527/bouncing-boobs-o.gif