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todster
04-24-2009, 12:54 AM
Ok basic question here. When looking for a radio to mount in the trailer or truck, why would you prefer to use a dual band over a single? I realize there is the opportunity to slide into FRS frequencies and such, but besides that what are the advantages? Higher power? Longer disatance?

Just a thought because I am shopping and a single band VHF can be had for about half the price and up to 75W!

Let me know what you guys think

J.T.
04-24-2009, 12:57 AM
Ok basic question here. When looking for a radio to mount in the trailer or truck, why would you prefer to use a dual band over a single? I realize there is the opportunity to slide into FRS frequencies and such, but besides that what are the advantages? Higher power? Longer disatance?

Just a thought because I am shopping and a single band VHF can be had for about half the price and up to 75W!

Let me know what you guys think

If you are planning on using it for Chase duties where you would Need MULTIPLE frequencies Dual band,


If Not, Single Band is more than Sufficient

JJ
04-24-2009, 01:05 AM
who is licensed?
what are the requirements?
or is that opening a can of worms
or don't ask don't tell

J.T.
04-24-2009, 01:09 AM
or don't ask don't tell

:D
















If you was base stationing with Huge aerials at the house and stuff I would say Get a liscense but for this I would not sweat it perse

SoCal
04-24-2009, 01:28 AM
who is licensed?
what are the requirements?
or is that opening a can of worms
or don't ask don't tell

:D

If you was base stationing with Huge aerials at the house and stuff I would say Get a liscense but for this I would not sweat it perse

His name is Jeff, not Perse.

diirk
04-24-2009, 03:07 AM
I'd recommend dual-band for the reason you already mentioned. The ability to access the FRS/GMRS frequencys. There's a lot of folks that don't have race radios or hams, and this will still allow you to communicate. Though a note: if using your dual-band radio to xmt on FRS freqs, be sure to dial the power down. FRS radios are only licensed to operate at 5W.

s@ndm@n
04-24-2009, 03:20 AM
for the truck get a dual band... you can pick them up on ebay for reasonable $$$.

todster
04-24-2009, 04:01 AM
OK I will shop the duals. Now, is there an actual advantage in transmitting distance between VHF and UHF??

Buggs
04-24-2009, 04:14 AM
Todd I got a tech study guide if you decide to get licensed.

todster
04-24-2009, 05:32 AM
Todd I got a tech study guide if you decide to get licensed.

Might just take you up on that.

diirk
04-24-2009, 02:31 PM
OK I will shop the duals. Now, is there an actual advantage in transmitting distance between VHF and UHF??

They're both pretty similar in that they're Line of Sight (LOS). VHF tends to have more issues with ground terrain and UHF tends to work a little better around concrete and steel.

Lower frequency is less likely to be blocked by objects
Lower frequency is more likely to bend (it will follow a wire, where as higher freqs in the gigahertz range need coaxial cable and waveguides (and radar horns!) to make them get to the antenna)
Lower frequency in general needs more power to transmit
Higher frequency can carry more information (higher bandwidth).
Higher frequencies are more generally available, while low ones have mostly been reserved for specific uses.

lq9hd
04-24-2009, 04:40 PM
how tough is it to get a license ?
pretty involved or just read the book, take a test ?

For the Tech. license its pretty simple 35 question multiple choice test.

Buggs
04-24-2009, 04:44 PM
I bought the study guide and read through it, took the practice tests a couple of times and breezed through the test. The ARRL site has a database with the test time and locations near you.

J.T.
04-24-2009, 04:47 PM
I should probably get my tech liscense
duane can you send em a copy as well?

Buggs
04-24-2009, 08:13 PM
There are several websites setup with study guides as well. I got the ARRL manual from barnes and nobel. I think Eric has one too. Most sites have a database of test questions, so if you are online with time to kill those are free.

diirk
04-24-2009, 08:24 PM
I think I still have one guide. I think Phatty has the other. With a little study, the test is a cake-walk. I crammed the nite before and missed one.

todster
04-25-2009, 02:42 AM
They're both pretty similar in that they're Line of Sight (LOS). VHF tends to have more issues with ground terrain and UHF tends to work a little better around concrete and steel.

Lower frequency is less likely to be blocked by objects
Lower frequency is more likely to bend (it will follow a wire, where as higher freqs in the gigahertz range need coaxial cable and waveguides (and radar horns!) to make them get to the antenna)
Lower frequency in general needs more power to transmit
Higher frequency can carry more information (higher bandwidth).
Higher frequencies are more generally available, while low ones have mostly been reserved for specific uses.

Got it

Thanks

truggyboy
04-25-2009, 03:04 AM
Good info. I need all I can get.